Friday, October 31 2014

Sunday Express pays damages to King Fahad Academy for 'extremist' claims


The Guardian reports that the Sunday Express Newspaper has apologised and paid damages to the King Fahad Academy, a private school based in west London, after it published a libelous front page story last year in which it wrongly claimed that the school taught extreme Islam.

From the Guardian:

“The Sunday Express has apologised and paid damages to a London school it falsely claimed taught an extreme form of Islam.

“Northern & Shell's Sunday title published a front-page story on 12 June 2011, headlined "Spies in schools to hunt fanatics", in which it wrongly stated that the King Fahad Academy in Acton, west London, taught extreme Islam.

“The article, which was also published on the paper's website, falsely suggested that the academy school had been infiltrated by Islamic fanatics.

“Clare Kissin, counsel for the King Fahad Academy, said in a statement at the high court in London on Tuesday: "The King Fahad Academy does not teach an extreme form of Islam, nor does it teach its students antisemitism or any form of racism and it has not been infiltrated by Islamic fanatics."

“The Sunday Express apologised for the article and said it regretted the distress caused. The paper agreed to pay an undisclosed amount in damages and legal costs to the school.”


The director of the school, Dr Sumaya Alyusuf stated that she was pleased with the outcome and that, "The school can now concentrate on its mission to provide a world class international education to students through a well-balanced curriculum, which aims to produce citizens who appreciate the multicultural world in which we live."

The King Fahad Academy, has been the subject of something of a media witch hunt in recent years. As Islamophobia Watch has documented, a furore was made in 2007 over claims that the school was using textbooks that used racist and offensive terms to describe Christians and Jews. The school was cleared of any wrongdoing, and has since received very positive appraisal from the school standards body, Ofsted, which has described its quality of teaching as “good overall, with some outstanding practices.'' The Academy's ethos was described in a review as promoting “respect and harmony between different cultures and beliefs.”

The Academy is not alone in being the subject of a witch hunts. A report published by the Institute of Public Policy Research last year found that ‘madrassas’ have been the subject of increasing media attention with national newspapers showing tendencies to publish stories with a negative slant, despite the positive things that many of them achieve.

It is also worth noting that Express Newspapers have been among the worst culprits when it comes to publishing stories which scaremonger about Muslims and Islam. Northern and Shell- the group behind the Express Newspapers as well as the Daily Star and the Star on Sunday, withdrew from the Press Complaints Commission in 2011, effectively withdrawing from compliance with the press body's Code of Practice. As was pointed out in evidence to the Leveson Inquiry, these papers have been serial offenders in publishing Islamophobic stories. It remains to be seen whether a new press regulator will have the teeth required to prevent such irresponsible journalistic practices from occurring in the future.









Comments  

 
0 #1 Education of Bilingual Muslim ChildrenIftikhar Ahmad 2012-08-06 16:12
Muslim schools Performance Table published in the Muslim News (March 30). I have not seen this published anywhere.We keep on reading in the other media that Muslim children and schools do not do well. But according to the GCSE Table published, Muslims schools achieve better than the national average, in English and Maths. We should be celebrating such achievements. We don’t hear this from our leaders at all. All credits to the teachers and head teachers in Muslim schools for helping Muslim pupils achieve good results. Panorama started with praise for most Muslim schools, showing Al-Furqan as an example of what most schools are doing right.

I feel the media machine has stereotyped Muslim schools as non-cohesive and extremist, the truth of the matter is they are no different to any other school; sorry, the only difference being that majority excel in academic achievement…is that a bad thing?

British society and British education system is the home of institutional racism. That is a fact. The solution is that each and every community should have their own state funded schools with their own teachers. Muslim children suffer more than others.They need state funded Muslim schools with bilingual Muslim teachers as role models during their developmental periods.

Muslim schools fight against open discrimination, extremist and agressive atheist and secularist ideas that are now infringing upon our fundamental human rights. A form of social engineering not disimilar to the failed idealogy of communism. LEAs are unable to reconcile diversity and inclusion. They are implementing policies that effectively create confusion, ambiguity and can be abused to prevent any new community service that promotes and celebrates diversity. Muslim schools are attempting to make a stand on behalf of all those who believe that we have the right to choose how to educate our children.

There are hundreds of state and church schools where Muslim children are in majority. In my opinion, all such schools may be opted out as Muslim Academies.

There is no place for a non-Muslim child or a teacher in a Muslim school. Bilingual Muslim children need bilingual Muslim teachers as role models during their developmental periods.

Demand for Islamic education in England is growing fast and schools – official and unofficial – are springing up to meet it. Now some local authorities are concerned that there is insufficient regulation. Although the number of Islamic schools is still small – around 168 at the latest count, just 12 of them state-funded – it is growing fast. About 60 of these schools have opened in the last 10 years; several in the last couple of months. And the demand from parents seems to be huge – one school in Birmingham recently attracted 1,500 applications for just 60 places. At least five Islamic schools have recently applied to be free schools, although so far only one has been approved. Islam promotes seeking knowledge as a form of worship, and things like "memorising the Quran" are rewardable. That makes memorising anything else look easy. Muslims live up to a certain strict code which parents enforce on their children, thereby making them adhere to their schoolwork more than their non-religious counterparts. Islam puts a massive emphasis on education and its essentially part of the religion itself since its Sunnah (following in the manners of the Prophet (pbuh)) but also a lot of the pupils will be from ethnic minority families and stereotypes aside it’s no secret that they encourage their children to excel in their exams and what not.

Muslim schools Performance Table published in the Muslim News (March 30). I have not seen this published anywhere.We keep on reading in the other media that Muslim children and schools do not do well. But according to the GCSE Table, Muslims schools achieve better than the national average, in English and Maths. We should be celebrating such achievements. We don’t hear this from our leaders at all. All credits to the teachers and head teachers in Muslim schools for helping Muslim pupils achieve good results.

Anti Islam propoganda in the Western media for the past 20 years, which accellerated after the 911, is having the opposite effect. Some educated people in the West mainly out of curiosity want to learn what Islam is about. When they approach their research with an open mind, probably most of them form positive impressions about Islam and some of whom rightfully convert. In the USA after the events of 911, convertions to Islam pheonominally increased maily in amongst the educated white community and a large majority of them were females.
IA
http://www.londonschoolofislamics.org.uk
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